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Screed against the rule of women, whether of nations or of families, citing Biblical passages and other ancient writings.
Topics: Queens, female rule, Bible interpretation, Mary I (1516-1558), Queen of England, Mary Queen of...
Boston College Library
by Sullivan, Timothy M; Valette, Rebecca M; Catholic Church Book of hours (Ms. Connolly). English & French. 1999
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Includes bibliographical references (p. 63)
Topics: Boston College. John J. Burns Library, Connolly book of hours, Connolly book of hours, Books of...
American Libraries
by Husband, Timothy, 1945-; J. Paul Getty Museum; Metropolitan Museum of Art (New York, N.Y.)
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Catalog of an exhibition at the J. Paul Getty Museum, Los Angeles, Nov. 18, 2008-Feb. 8, 2009, and at The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York, Sept. 22, 2009-Jan. 3, 2010
Topics: bub_upload, Limburg family, Belles heures of Jean of France, Duke of Berry, Books of hours,...
Source: http://books.google.com/books?id=ey3F_rZwNTUC&hl=&source=gbs_api
The Grandes Chroniques de France is a vernacular, frequently illustrated history of the medieval French monarchs. Originally describing the lives of the kings from their origins in Troy in 1274 to the reign of Philip Augustus, it was updated in several stages to the life of Charles VI. Copied and amended for a variety of royal and courtly patrons, approximately 130 of these manuscripts exist today. Anne Hedeman provides the first critical and comprehensive study of the chronicle's...
Topics: История, Grandes chroniques de France, Illumination of books and manuscripts, French,...
Books for People with Print Disabilities
by Renault, Mary
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Includes index
Topic: Alexander, the Great, 356-323 B.C
Source: removed
Books for People with Print Disabilities
by Morris, Ian, 1960-; Scheidel, Walter, 1966-
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The world's first known empires took shape in Mesopotamia between the eastern shores of the Mediterranean Sea and the Persian Gulf, beginning around 2350 BCE. The next 2,500 years witnessed sustained imperial growth, bringing a growing share of humanity under the control of ever-fewer states. Two thousand years ago, just four major powers--the Roman, Parthian, Kushan, and Han empires--ruled perhaps two-thirds of the earth's entire population. Yet despite empires' prominence in the early history...
Topics: State, The, Imperialism